Why Use Conservation or Museum Glass?

As framer’s, we see the effects of UV light on artwork,, color photographs and textiles every day. Unfortunately, once the damage is done, there is no way to reverse fading caused by light. The best way to protect your treasures is by selecting Conservation or Museum Glass when designing framing. If the piece is already framed, but you suspect it may be fading, we can help you to determine the best course of action and replace the glazing if needed. Just bring it in for a consultation!

Fabric items like this Tibetan cap are highly vulnerable to fading caused by UV light. The deep blue fabric mat can likewise fade over time. We selected Museum Glass for maximum protection and minimum glare.

Fabric items like this Tibetan cap are highly vulnerable to fading caused by UV light. The deep blue fabric mat can likewise fade over time. We selected Museum Glass for maximum protection and minimum glare.

One question we are frequently asked is: what is the difference between Conservation and Museum Glass? Conservation Glass filters out 99% of the harmful UV rays that cause light damage and looks like regular glass: clear and shiny. Museum Glass also filters out 99% of UV light, but has the added feature of being clear and virtually non-reflective because of a special coating. It allows artwork, objects or textiles to be viewed at every angle with very little glare interference. Both products are also available in acrylic options, with the Optimum Museum Acrylic being the highest quality glazing on the market.

If you own art, photos or prints of high value or personal significance, we’re happy to consult with you to make sure you have protected them properly!

A Visit with the Pope

A client brought mementos of a special visit with the Pope in Rome. A shadowbox frame solution was proposed to accommodate the beanie without crushing it. We decided to inset the smaller items into a window in the mat to give them emphasis and visual organization. Attention was paid to both appropriate aesthetics and overall size. The final result is a gem that protects and presents the memory of this event for the client and his family. 

Photo of The Pope, papal beanie, and a crucifix were elements that needed to be included in the shadowbox. 

Photo of The Pope, papal beanie, and a crucifix were elements that needed to be included in the shadowbox. 

A deep shadowbox frame in ornate silver was selected for height to accommodate the 4" beanie. The gilded style was repeated in a smaller silver filet.

A deep shadowbox frame in ornate silver was selected for height to accommodate the 4" beanie. The gilded style was repeated in a smaller silver filet.

Batting was prepared to add volume to the inside of the beanie, which will be sewn to the backing mat. Sewing is archival because it can be undone with a few snips. 

Batting was prepared to add volume to the inside of the beanie, which will be sewn to the backing mat. Sewing is archival because it can be undone with a few snips. 

The elements are ready for assembly: frame, mat, and mounted objects. 

The elements are ready for assembly: frame, mat, and mounted objects. 

The project was finished with Museum Glass to protect it from light damage and offer minimal visual interference. Can you see the glass? 

The project was finished with Museum Glass to protect it from light damage and offer minimal visual interference. Can you see the glass?